Last Day of Orientation

November 25, 2023

Author: Lev Janicki, Hamilton College

Reefing the mains'l
S312_25Nov2023_small

Ship's Log

25 November 2023Current Position: Docked in AucklandShip's Heading & Speed: StationaryWeather: Windy and Partially Cloudy

Ki Ora everybody! Today started very early for A Watch, I myself having the0430 to 0600 shift with Jess. The sunrise was very disappointing as a coupleof buildings in Auckland's port completely blocked all of the would bepretty parts. Breakfast was biscuits and gravy. After breakfast A Watch didchores, B Watch was on dishes in the galley, and C Watch got to work rinsingthe snack crumbs and land dirt off the deck. Once the ship's duties werecompleted the first orientation station rotation of the day could begin.This morning we had the exciting lessons of line handling, lookout standing,and learning how to use the J-frame and winch for science deployments. Linehandling is mostly about trying to manage the tension of the lines throughuse of a technique called "palming," where you use your palm to keep theline pressed against the pin and the tension off of the part you have tohandle. Rocky's lecture on lookout duties was mostly about how you shouldreport everything you see, especially the interesting clouds (for weatherreasons and because he likes a good cloud). It was sprinkled with anecdotesabout students who reported too much and students who reported too littleand the importance of a good lookout to assisting other mariners indistress. Rocky also used the end of his time to go over helm standing alittle, the main point being that the Seamans steers weird and can vary inhow she handles depending on the weather and tack. J-Frame deployment wasthe last of the morning rotations, and it was about having clearcommunication and repeating orders back. All deployments must have Deb ourChief Science Officer standing by. Notably, A Watch has begun to call JessJ-Frame.After rotations, lunch was ready to be served. I have been told lunch was adish called Daal; I only remember it being delicious as is standard withAshley's cooking. Ashley has told us to be prepared for her cooking to getworse as ingredients become more sparse further into our voyage, but I donot believe her. After lunch we went directly into Siesta, during which Ielected to find a sunny spot out of the wind on the lab top to read. Thewhereabouts of everyone else was a mystery to me - a good book can do thatto you. I was not the only reader, I was joined by Diego, Nick, Aly andJess, where we formed a cozy bunch in the sailbags. At 1600 snack was servedand Ashley outdid herself. Yesterday's potato leek soup was used to makeincredibly fluffy and tasty rolls, served with garlic butter. We hovered andswooped like seagulls until they were gone in a matter of minutes.Our afternoon rotations covered a class discussion of some readings on theAnthropocene, a demonstration of how to deploy the Neuston net, and anotherepisode of the Rocky show, this one on how to ascertain true wind speed anddirection. Before dinner, A Watch was given a chance to practice our linehandling skills through realigning the top yard. After dinner B and CWatches helped put a deep reef in the mains'l (see photo). Unfortunately asa proud member of A Watch, I missed the action down in the galley cleaning.In some consolation, we were told we did a very efficient galley clean,which I believe was due to the sheer amount of grease relocated to Jack'shands. I have hit my head on the same place in the stairs to the charthousepossibly 3 times today, one of them very embarrassingly in front of CaptainAllison. I just received my night orders for 0000-0130, and I hope my headremains un-bumped until at least after that time. The whole of the ship isexcited tomorrow to shove off hopefully around lunch!Until the next adventure,Lev Janicki (Hamilton College 2027)

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