Learning the Ropes, Well Lines Actually

April 14, 2021

Jeff Schell, Chief Scientist

Julia learns how to 'dance' with the science equipment with the help of First Scientist Anna. Izzy is doing her part by driving the hydrowinch controls
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Julia learns how to 'dance' with the science equipment with the help of First Scientist Anna. Izzy is doing her part by driving the hydrowinch controls

Ship's Log

Noon Position
Alongside the University of South Florida Marine Science Center dock.

Weather / Wind / Sail Plan
Wind has shifted from the east at Beaufort Force 3, to a it lighter and now coming from the west.  But we are still tied to the pier.

Description of location
A busy little part of Tampa Bay, various boats both commercial and recreational going by and giving us a wave.  But we are happy in our COVID free bubble on the Cramer.

Souls on Board

Perhaps you have paid close attention to our ship's name, the SSV Corwith Cramer. Sailing School Vessel. That means no passengers, only crew, so the students have a fair bit of training to complete before we can safely head out to sea.Aloft training on a lovely, sunny day.

We have made the most of our time today with a series of training sessions led by our professional crew. The science team, led by 1st Scientist Anna, introduced students to the safe operation of the hydrowinch and hydraulic J-Frame. Commands such as 'Wire lower, wire stop, J-Frame out, wire raise, J-Frame in', all gear is aboard, etc.' were given and repeated across the science deck. Thankful to say I never once had to use the Emergency Stop button. They are learning quickly!

On deck students gathered with 2nd Mate Carolyn and learned proper line handling skills: hauling, coiling, sweating and tailing, making fast, etc.; each skill essential to the safe and successful setting and striking of sails. Later on students met with 3rd Mate Sara on the head rig and furled the jib. And finally, just for fun, students had the opportunity to climb aloft on the foremast under the watchful tutelage of Chief Mate Rocky. It was a busy and the students are doing a wonderful job soaking up all of this knowledge. Soon we will be ready to cast off the dock lines and head out to sea.

- Jeff Schell, Chief Scientist

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