A Gal Named Gail

Gisela & Gabriella, C Watch and A Watch, College of The Atlantic

Gisella and Gabriella teach us about all the eddies (ocean weather systems) we found.
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Gisella and Gabriella teach us about all the eddies (ocean weather systems) we found.

Ella explains why we have not been finding large blooms of jellies in the Caribbean.
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Ella explains why we have not been finding large blooms of jellies in the Caribbean.

There once was a gal named Gail in a gale in the galley named Gail in a gale cookin whale.

There once was an Eddy named Freddy who slept in a beddy of bready who got out of beddy to go to the heady that spins like an eddy, and while in the heady they jumped in his beddy to grab all the bready.

Presentation

Orly and Antione tell us about all the phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae) we didn't find and why!

There once was a zoop floating in soup who got lost in the goop of the zoop soup. We slurped down the goop with a bowlful of soup and a chunk of bready from Eddy Freddy's beddy.

Out came Gail from the galley with a pail of whale from the gale named Gail to slurp the soup and the goop of zoop and a chunk of bready from Eddy Freddy's beddy.

When the gale hit the sail and made us all pale we sailed like a whale that's lost its tail. We slipped and slipped and whipped the ship and now we're going south.

Sofia describes all of the marine mammal sightings during our cruise.

Sofia describes all of the marine mammal sightings during our cruise.

That's all to say that we tried to anchor at Dry Tortugas yesterday for a final shore trip, but halfway through our oceanography presentations (we presented our project together on the eddies and currents of our cruise track) the anchor started dragging as gale-force winds picked up. We had to leave immediately and head south once again into the Gulf Stream. Captain Rebecca has assigned us a last mission: to figure out during each of our watches how to whip the boat around and sail back toward Key West given the state of the winds and currents.

As we sit here in the library typing, the sun shining through the porthole slowly traveled across our faces. B watch finally decided to gybe before we slipped back into Cuban waters. Although everyone is severely (I repeat severely) disappointed to not go snorkeling with Loggerhead Turtles and see more of Dry Tortugas we are excited for this final mission!

Nick, Margot and Tegan explain the results of their Sargassum experiments.

Nick, Margot and Tegan explain the results of their Sargassum experiments.

It's hard to believe we're at the end. Only a few more sunrises and sunsets left. Will Gisela and Gabriella finally see the green flash? Who knows.

We're so grateful to everyone who has been a part of this adventure: Jeff Schell, Capt. Rebecca, Craig Marin, Chris Nolan, Matt Birhle, Jeff David, Sydney, Sarah, Chef Will, extraordinary engineers Abby and Will, marvelous mates Rocky, Ava, and Fern; stupendous scientists Emily, Jenna, Katherine, and Mateo; dedicated deckhands Spatula, Reba, Nate, Colleen, Bird, Vuk, Audrey, Beanz, and of course our fellow student shipmates. Cramah 4 Life!

Sil entertains us with his results demonstrating the diel vertical migration patterns of zooplankton.

Sil entertains us with his results demonstrating the diel vertical migration patterns of zooplankton.

- Gisela & Gabriella, C Watch and A Watch, College of The Atlantic

Loggerhead Key and lighthouse. The view just before we dragged anchor and set sail for the Gulf Stream.

Loggerhead Key and lighthouse. The view just before we dragged anchor and set sail for the Gulf Stream.

Contact: Douglas Karlson, Director of Communications, 508-444-1918 | dkarlson@sea.edu

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2 Comments

  1. Sydney Lynch March 24, 2022 at 09:46 - Reply

    I hope you guys had an amazing time!!

  2. Pat Nucciarone March 24, 2022 at 10:45 - Reply

    Congratulations to all now-true swabbies!!! May the rest of your lives meet fair winds after the inevitable gales…or Gails… that will seek to divert your true course.

    Many hugs await, Gisela!

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